A knockoff "Hard Rock Cafe Afghanistan" coffee mug sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield which offers Western style cafes, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. 

A knockoff "Hard Rock Cafe Afghanistan" coffee mug sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield which offers Western style cafes, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. 

 A "Taliban Hunting Club" T-shirt sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield, which offers Western style cafes, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. The shirt has become popular with soldiers on the front line and their supporters back home.

A "Taliban Hunting Club" T-shirt sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield, which offers Western style cafes, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. The shirt has become popular with soldiers on the front line and their supporters back home.

 Shrapnel from a rocket-propelled grenade fired by the Taliban at coalition troops during Operation Medusa in Kandahar province in 2006. At the time, it was the most significant land battle ever undertaken by NATO.

Shrapnel from a rocket-propelled grenade fired by the Taliban at coalition troops during Operation Medusa in Kandahar province in 2006. At the time, it was the most significant land battle ever undertaken by NATO.

 Safe Conduct Passes are typically airdropped by Psychological Operations units into populated areas prior to a military operation.   The leaflet reads:  "Insurgent, Taliban, Member of Hezb-e-Islami, Al-Qaeda: By approaching Afghan and coalition troops with this pass and following the procedure on the back you will indicate to the soldiers that you wish to stop fighting. My soldiers will treat you with dignity and you will not be harmed.  Afghan Soldier, Coalition Soldier:  The person who carries this pass is using it as a sign of his genuine wish to stop fighting. He comes in peace and is protected by law. He is to be well treated and is not to be harmed."

Safe Conduct Passes are typically airdropped by Psychological Operations units into populated areas prior to a military operation. 

The leaflet reads:

"Insurgent, Taliban, Member of Hezb-e-Islami, Al-Qaeda:
By approaching Afghan and coalition troops with this pass and following the procedure on the back you will indicate to the soldiers that you wish to stop fighting. My soldiers will treat you with dignity and you will not be harmed.

Afghan Soldier, Coalition Soldier: 
The person who carries this pass is using it as a sign of his genuine wish to stop fighting. He comes in peace and is protected by law. He is to be well treated and is not to be harmed."

 Tim Hortons camouflage cap - a highly coveted souvenir by soldiers and contractors serving at Kandahar Airfield.   Since opening in Kandahar Airfield in 2006, the popular Canadian coffee shop Tim Hortons has served four million cups of coffee, three million donuts and half a million iced cappuccinos and bagels to 2.5 million customers. After five years of serving customers from  37 different nationalities, the Tim Hortons outlet in Afghanistan closed in 2011. 

Tim Hortons camouflage cap - a highly coveted souvenir by soldiers and contractors serving at Kandahar Airfield. 

Since opening in Kandahar Airfield in 2006, the popular Canadian coffee shop Tim Hortons has served four million cups of coffee, three million donuts and half a million iced cappuccinos and bagels to 2.5 million customers. After five years of serving customers from  37 different nationalities, the Tim Hortons outlet in Afghanistan closed in 2011. 

 A "Major League Infidel" velcro patch that replicates the Major League Baseball logo was sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield, which offers Western style cafe's, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. The patch is often worn on a soldiers sleeve or body armour on the battlefield.

A "Major League Infidel" velcro patch that replicates the Major League Baseball logo was sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield, which offers Western style cafe's, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. The patch is often worn on a soldiers sleeve or body armour on the battlefield.

 A Soviet-era pistol holster found on a Taliban position during Operation Medusa in Kandahar province in 2006. At the time, it was the most significant land battle ever undertaken by NATO.

A Soviet-era pistol holster found on a Taliban position during Operation Medusa in Kandahar province in 2006. At the time, it was the most significant land battle ever undertaken by NATO.

 A handmade Afghanistan war rug sold at Kandahar Airfield's weekly bazaar.   The bazaar was introduced so coalition troops could shop from local traders within the safety of the base, and to provide a small cash injection to the local economy. The vendors sold many items, from counterfeit DVD's, jewelry, daggers, traditional clothing to crafts. 

A handmade Afghanistan war rug sold at Kandahar Airfield's weekly bazaar. 

The bazaar was introduced so coalition troops could shop from local traders within the safety of the base, and to provide a small cash injection to the local economy. The vendors sold many items, from counterfeit DVD's, jewelry, daggers, traditional clothing to crafts. 

 Operation Enduring Freedom Afghanistan Challenge Coin.   A military challenge coin usually bears a unit or organization’s insignia and/or the title of a military operation.   The use of challenge coins in the military is nuanced. Challenge coins are typically presented by unit commanders in acknowledgement of special accomplishment, or to prove membership in a particular unit or to those who had served as a part of a military operation.    Members traditionally "challenge" each other by slamming the coin down on the bar. If a member doesn't have their coin, he or she has to buy a drink for the challenger and for anyone else that has their coin. If all members have their coins, the challenger must buy everyone drinks.

Operation Enduring Freedom Afghanistan Challenge Coin. 

A military challenge coin usually bears a unit or organization’s insignia and/or the title of a military operation. 

The use of challenge coins in the military is nuanced. Challenge coins are typically presented by unit commanders in acknowledgement of special accomplishment, or to prove membership in a particular unit or to those who had served as a part of a military operation.  

Members traditionally "challenge" each other by slamming the coin down on the bar. If a member doesn't have their coin, he or she has to buy a drink for the challenger and for anyone else that has their coin. If all members have their coins, the challenger must buy everyone drinks.

 A knockoff "Hard Rock Cafe Afghanistan" coffee mug sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield which offers Western style cafes, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. 
 A "Taliban Hunting Club" T-shirt sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield, which offers Western style cafes, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. The shirt has become popular with soldiers on the front line and their supporters back home.
 Shrapnel from a rocket-propelled grenade fired by the Taliban at coalition troops during Operation Medusa in Kandahar province in 2006. At the time, it was the most significant land battle ever undertaken by NATO.
 Safe Conduct Passes are typically airdropped by Psychological Operations units into populated areas prior to a military operation.   The leaflet reads:  "Insurgent, Taliban, Member of Hezb-e-Islami, Al-Qaeda: By approaching Afghan and coalition troops with this pass and following the procedure on the back you will indicate to the soldiers that you wish to stop fighting. My soldiers will treat you with dignity and you will not be harmed.  Afghan Soldier, Coalition Soldier:  The person who carries this pass is using it as a sign of his genuine wish to stop fighting. He comes in peace and is protected by law. He is to be well treated and is not to be harmed."
 Tim Hortons camouflage cap - a highly coveted souvenir by soldiers and contractors serving at Kandahar Airfield.   Since opening in Kandahar Airfield in 2006, the popular Canadian coffee shop Tim Hortons has served four million cups of coffee, three million donuts and half a million iced cappuccinos and bagels to 2.5 million customers. After five years of serving customers from  37 different nationalities, the Tim Hortons outlet in Afghanistan closed in 2011. 
 A "Major League Infidel" velcro patch that replicates the Major League Baseball logo was sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield, which offers Western style cafe's, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. The patch is often worn on a soldiers sleeve or body armour on the battlefield.
 A Soviet-era pistol holster found on a Taliban position during Operation Medusa in Kandahar province in 2006. At the time, it was the most significant land battle ever undertaken by NATO.
 A handmade Afghanistan war rug sold at Kandahar Airfield's weekly bazaar.   The bazaar was introduced so coalition troops could shop from local traders within the safety of the base, and to provide a small cash injection to the local economy. The vendors sold many items, from counterfeit DVD's, jewelry, daggers, traditional clothing to crafts. 
 Operation Enduring Freedom Afghanistan Challenge Coin.   A military challenge coin usually bears a unit or organization’s insignia and/or the title of a military operation.   The use of challenge coins in the military is nuanced. Challenge coins are typically presented by unit commanders in acknowledgement of special accomplishment, or to prove membership in a particular unit or to those who had served as a part of a military operation.    Members traditionally "challenge" each other by slamming the coin down on the bar. If a member doesn't have their coin, he or she has to buy a drink for the challenger and for anyone else that has their coin. If all members have their coins, the challenger must buy everyone drinks.

A knockoff "Hard Rock Cafe Afghanistan" coffee mug sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield which offers Western style cafes, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. 

A "Taliban Hunting Club" T-shirt sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield, which offers Western style cafes, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. The shirt has become popular with soldiers on the front line and their supporters back home.

Shrapnel from a rocket-propelled grenade fired by the Taliban at coalition troops during Operation Medusa in Kandahar province in 2006. At the time, it was the most significant land battle ever undertaken by NATO.

Safe Conduct Passes are typically airdropped by Psychological Operations units into populated areas prior to a military operation. 

The leaflet reads:

"Insurgent, Taliban, Member of Hezb-e-Islami, Al-Qaeda:
By approaching Afghan and coalition troops with this pass and following the procedure on the back you will indicate to the soldiers that you wish to stop fighting. My soldiers will treat you with dignity and you will not be harmed.

Afghan Soldier, Coalition Soldier: 
The person who carries this pass is using it as a sign of his genuine wish to stop fighting. He comes in peace and is protected by law. He is to be well treated and is not to be harmed."

Tim Hortons camouflage cap - a highly coveted souvenir by soldiers and contractors serving at Kandahar Airfield. 

Since opening in Kandahar Airfield in 2006, the popular Canadian coffee shop Tim Hortons has served four million cups of coffee, three million donuts and half a million iced cappuccinos and bagels to 2.5 million customers. After five years of serving customers from  37 different nationalities, the Tim Hortons outlet in Afghanistan closed in 2011. 

A "Major League Infidel" velcro patch that replicates the Major League Baseball logo was sold in a gift shop at "The Boardwalk", the social center of Kandahar Airfield, which offers Western style cafe's, gift shops, restaurants and sports fields. The patch is often worn on a soldiers sleeve or body armour on the battlefield.

A Soviet-era pistol holster found on a Taliban position during Operation Medusa in Kandahar province in 2006. At the time, it was the most significant land battle ever undertaken by NATO.

A handmade Afghanistan war rug sold at Kandahar Airfield's weekly bazaar. 

The bazaar was introduced so coalition troops could shop from local traders within the safety of the base, and to provide a small cash injection to the local economy. The vendors sold many items, from counterfeit DVD's, jewelry, daggers, traditional clothing to crafts. 

Operation Enduring Freedom Afghanistan Challenge Coin. 

A military challenge coin usually bears a unit or organization’s insignia and/or the title of a military operation. 

The use of challenge coins in the military is nuanced. Challenge coins are typically presented by unit commanders in acknowledgement of special accomplishment, or to prove membership in a particular unit or to those who had served as a part of a military operation.  

Members traditionally "challenge" each other by slamming the coin down on the bar. If a member doesn't have their coin, he or she has to buy a drink for the challenger and for anyone else that has their coin. If all members have their coins, the challenger must buy everyone drinks.

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